Transportation Needs

The existing Eastern Corridor transportation network is characterized by heavy congestion, delays during peak travel times and high accident rates. A number of important underlying issues contribute to these transportation problems:

INADEQUATE CAPACITY ON EXISTING ROADWAY NETWORK

  • Many key routes are two lanes and have not been substantially improved in more than 40 years
  • Current traffic volumes exceed the capacity for which the roads were designed
  • Current congestion, traffic delays and hazardous driving conditions are expected to worsen over time due to increased traffic volumes

Morning congestion within the Eastern Corridor (Dec. 2012)

Summary graphics from the Tier 1 Purpose and Need:

Project planners use the OKI Travel Demand Model to forecast travel demand and the impacts traffic levels will have on road infrastructure. Click here to read more information about the OKI Travel Demand Model.

LIMITED TRANSPORTATION MODE OPTIONS

  • Autos/trucks account for 99% of Eastern Corridor travel
  • Rail transit is currently not available
  • Bus transit is limited to a few key routes
  • Existing bike facilities do not provide a fully functional transportation option for commuters

Summary graphics from the Tier 1 Purpose and Need:


POOR CONNECTIVITY, INDIRECT ROUTES

  • Poor connectivity forces traffic onto I-275 to reach I-71 and I-75 or to use I-471 to get to downtown Cincinnati
  • The Little Miami River forms a physical barrier; the existing four bridges over the river are pinch points for east-west travel
  • Indirect travel routes and limited east-west access adds to congestion, delays, miles traveled, fuel consumed and poor air quality

Summary graphics from the Tier 1 Purpose and Need:


INEFFICIENT MOVEMENT OF GOODS AND SERVICES, LIMITED GROWTH OPPORTUNITIES

  • Truck traffic is compromised by delays and poor connectivity, resulting in the inefficient movement of goods and services
  • Inefficient transportation framework is isolating economic centers from regional, state and national trade flows
  • The economic value and equity of the region is compromised, compared to more efficiently connected metropolitan areas

More details about the Eastern Corridor’s transportation needs can be found in the Eastern Corridor Tier 1 Draft EIS.

Traffic within the Eastern Corridor (Dec. 2012)


PROJECTED PROGRAM IMPACT ON TRANSPORTATION NEEDS 

According to the results of studies conducted as part of the Tier 1 EIS, the benefits listed below would likely result if the Eastern Corridor Program is implemented as proposed. If nothing is done to meet current and future traffic demands, these benefits will not be realized:

  • People would spend 21,000 fewer hours in their automobiles each day due to better connections and less bottlenecks
  • People would experience an average of 15,000 fewer hours of congestion-related travel delays each day
  • People would travel an average of 137,000 fewer vehicle miles each day (50 million vehicle miles per year) due to more efficient network connections and options

For additional information, visit Program Benefits.